Medications at School

GENERAL GUIDELINES

Under federal law, prescription medication can be taken only by the person for whom it is prescribed. Misuse of prescription medication (including giving or receiving it) may result in suspension or expulsion.

Parents are responsible for knowing the expiration date of any medication brought to school and replacing it before the expiration date. School personnel will not administer any medication past its expiration date.

Safe Access to Vital Epinephrine (SAVE) Act
The Safe Access to Vital Epinephrine (SAVE) Act allows schools to store supplies of epinephrine auto-injectors for identified school staff to use in emergencies for students with allergic reactions. Parents and guardians of students with known allergies should continue to provide EpiPens for their children. Each BJA school has a at least two first responders who are trained in Epipen administration in the case of allergic reactions.

ELEMENTARY POLICIES

If a prescription or over-the-counter medication needs to be taken during the school day, a parent should bring it to the office in the original container along with a completed form for that medication. For a student needing to have an epinephrine injector at school, a completed Anaphylaxis Medication Authorization form should be submitted.

For a student that self-administers insulin, a completed Self-Administration Authorization form should be submitted. All medications must be kept in the clinic. Forms may be printed from the Academy’s website.

Parents are responsible for knowing the expiration date of any medication brought to school and replacing medication before the expiration date. School personnel do not administer any medication past its expiration date.

The elementary clinic stocks Tylenol, Benadryl, Vaseline, hydrocortisone cream, calamine lotion and cough drops. Any other over-the-counter medications (including Ibuprofen) your child needs should be provided by the parent.

The school nurse (or delegated staff) may not administer any medication that is not FDA approved. This includes herbal products, alternative medicinal products and essential oils. Because strong scents have been known to trigger asthma attacks, headaches and allergy symptoms in children and adults, please be aware that if you use essential oils on your child and the scent is noticeable you may be asked to not apply them before school or decrease the amount used.

Under federal law, prescription medication can be taken only by the person for whom it is prescribed. Misuse of prescription medication (including giving or receiving it) may result in suspension or expulsion.

The elementary school performs weekly checks on all students for head lice. These checks are done by parents who have been trained by the school nurse. This practice has significantly decreased the spread of lice in our school.

SECONDARY POLICIES

The school nurse does not have an office in the middle or high school. She is available to come on an as-needed basis for illness or injuries. Except for Benadryl, for emergency use only, over-the-counter medications are not stocked at the middle or high school. If a prescription medication is to be taken during the school day, a parent should deliver it to the office in the original container along with a completed form for that medication.

At the middle school, any student needing to have an epinephrine injector at school must submit a completed Anaphylaxis Medication Authorization form. Any student that self-administers insulin must submit a completed Self-Administration Authorization form. All medications must be kept in the office. If needed, inhalers and epinephrine injectors may be picked up at the office by the student to carry to physical education classes and other activities outside the building. All medications taken on a school-sponsored trip should be given, along with a completed School Trip Medication form, to a sponsor. The sponsor will administer the medication at the appropriate time.

At the high school, any student needing to have an epinephrine injector or inhaler at school may carry it but must submit a completed Self-Administration Authorization form. Students carrying an epinephrine injector must also submit an Anaphylaxis Medication Authorization form. High school students may carry their own non-prescription medications (for personal use only); a parental authorization form is not required. Prescription medications (other than inhalers, epinephrine injectors and diabetic supplies) that are needed on a school-sponsored trip are to be given, along with a completed Trip Medication form, to a sponsor. The sponsor will administer the medication at the appropriate time.

The necessary forms may be printed from the Academy’s website.

Parents are responsible for knowing the expiration date of any medication brought to school and replacing medication before the expiration date. School personnel do not administer any medication past its expiration date.

Under federal law, prescription medication can be taken only by the person for whom it is prescribed. Misuse of prescription medication (including giving or receiving it) may result in suspension or expulsion.