Grades 9 -12

Navigating High School

Course Descriptions

Bible 9

Provides an interactive study of Acts, the Epistles, and Revelation, encouraging students to have a passion for growth in Christlikeness as they encounter the truths of Scripture. The book of Acts covers Christ’s continuing work through the apostles who, by the power of the Holy Spirit, spread the Kingdom of God, even while facing persecution. The Epistles show the truths that ground believers and allow them to live out their faith. Finally, Revelation is the climactic fulfillment of Christ’s triumph over all things. The course is based on the BJU Press textbook The Triumph of Christ. Classes are divided by gender.

Bible 10

Is an introduction to several major doctrines related to the Word of God, the nature of God, man in God’s image, salvation, and the church. Students learn basic systematic theology skills for collecting and accurately summarizing biblical data. Biblical application skills are taught to enable students to relate Scripture to their own lives. A biblical worldview is incorporated to help each student develop critical thinking towards real-world issues, ultimate reality, and culture. Classes are divided by gender.

Bible 11

Includes study of both a biblical worldview and world religions. Students learn what a worldview is as well as the importance of seeing all of life through the lens of the biblical story line of Creation, Fall, and Redemption. Major world religions—including Judaism, Islam, Mormonism, Jehovah’s Witnesses and Roman Catholicism—are compared to the truth of Christianity. Classes are divided by gender.

Bible 12

Covers four major topics. A section on Bible study explores use of genre in Scripture as well as appropriate application to modern life. A personal evangelism and discipleship section includes study and hands-on training in these topics. A section on gender examines the institution of the family and gender roles in church and society. An apologetics study prepares students to defend their Christian beliefs against common objections to Christianity.

Dual Credit

Requirements

Suggested courses

  • Bc 241 Fundamentals of Counseling
  • Bi 205 Creation to New Creation: Exploring the Bible for Life
  • Bi 209 Hermeneutics: Interpreting the Bible for Life
  • ALG 101 Greek

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Applied Digital Skills

Introduces students to a variety of digital tools and skills used in a professional environment. Primarily covers Microsoft Office and Google Suite, focusing on practical applications for the home, college, and corporate settings. Students will develop speed and accuracy with typing. Embedded in the course is the development of communication etiquette, work ethic, professional skills, digital citizenship, and a Christ-centered approach to professionalism.

Graphic Design

Explores elements and principles of design and their effective application in graphic arts. Familiarizes students with the computer as a design tool. Utilizes Adobe InDesignIllustrator and PhotoShop. Includes taking design projects from initial brainstorming to a finished design piece.

  • For grades 10-12

Academian

Under faculty tutelage, students create the BJA yearbook, from initial planning of design and ladder to full implementation including photography, design, and layout.

  • By invitation.

Dual Credit

Requirements

Courses that satisfy BJA requirements

  • TEC 101 Digital Literacy (co-requirement: Tec 191 Digital Literacy Lecture)
  • TEC 201 Digital Literacy with Introductory Programming (co-requirement: Tec 291 Digital Literacy with Introductory Programming Lecture)
  • CpS 109 Introduction to Computer Programming (not applicable toward a computer science major or minor; Prerequisite: Math ACT 20+, SAT 550+, Ma 090 or Ma 10)
  • CpS 110 Object-Oriented Programming I (co-requirement: CpS 191 – Object-Oriented Programming I Lab; prerequisite: CpS 109 or ACT Math 26+; for Juniors lacking an ACT score, see the academic office to request placement)
  • CpS 209 Object-Oriented Programming II (co-requirement: CpS 293 Object-Oriented Programming II Lab; prerequisite: CpS 110 or placement test)

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English 9

Helps students review the parts of speech and identify types of phrases and clauses. Uses the study of literature to identify, analyze and evaluate the fundamentals of the short story, including conflict, character, theme, structure, point of view and moral tone. Builds toward the five-paragraph argumentative essay through freshman-level composition.

English 10

Reviews mechanics, usage, and grammar, including frequent practice in a variety of writing samples. Emphasizes, through a wide range of literature selections, an understanding of several genres and figures of speech and sound.  Students read and study two classic novels together and several books individually.  Focuses on both formal and creative writing.

English 11

Provides an overview of American writers and literature from the Colonial period through the modern age. Integrates basic grammar review and vocabulary study. Instructs in library resource skills and composition techniques. Composition focus includes literary analysis, creative writing, and a formal research paper.

English 12

Surveys British literature and history with a study of writers from the Old English period through the Modern period. Correlates special units in writing that include essays, poetry, and literary analysis. Provides college-preparatory writing instruction in style, logical thinking, and persuasion. Integrates frequent grammar review with the writing process.

  • En 102 Composition & Rhetoric may be taken in lieu of one semester English 12 (prerequisite for dual credit: ACT English 26+)
  • En 103 Composition & Literature may be taken in lieu of one semester English 12 (prerequisite: En 102 or BJU-approved CLEP score for En 102)
  • The English 12 requirement may also be satisfied by a combination of ACT English 26+, En 102 CLEP (BJU-approved score; received before the affected semester begins), and En 103 taken for dual credit.

Creative Writing

Explores several genres of writing, including poetry, children’s stories, short stories, blogs, plays, biographies, and novels with a unit on journalism to include podcasts, investigative journalism, and photojournalism.

  • For grades 10–12 and 9th graders who took 8th grade Creative Writing

Study Skills

Teaches basic study skills and reading development. Uses a hands-on approach to a variety of topics to develop a love of lifelong learning. Focuses on improving and implementing skills which include setting goals, taking notes, taking tests, studying effectively, organizing and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Reading development includes learning basic reading strategies, developing reading fluency especially in textbooks, and improving reading comprehension.

Dual Credit

Requirements

Courses that satisfy BJA requirements

  • En 102 Composition & Rhetoric may be taken in lieu of one semester English 12 (prerequisite for dual credit: ACT English 26+)
  • En 103 Composition & Literature may be taken in lieu of one semester English 12 (prerequisite: En 102 or BJU-approved CLEP score for En 102)
  • The English 12 requirement may also be satisfied by a combination of ACT English 26+, En 102 CLEP (BJU-approved score; received before the affected semester begins), and En 103 taken for dual credit.

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Art

Studio Art

Designed to be an exploratory course covering a broad variety of media. The student will develop their art practice through learning many different materials and techniques such as charcoal, pencil, pen, oil pastel, watercolor, acrylic, printmaking, and clay.  Studio time is prioritized, but the class also includes verbal critiques, written artist statements, art history lectures, demos, and exercises.

  • Materials: sketch book; 2B, 4B, H pencils; pink pearl eraser

Advanced Art (available on rotation)

Each advanced art class builds on the foundation of Studio Art. Studio time is prioritized, but advanced art classes also includes verbal critiques, written artist statements, art history lectures, demonstrations, and exercises.

Drawing and Painting further develops a student’s experimental techniques, expression, content, and the student’s individual style in drawing and painting. This class adds additional mediums to the student’s repertoire such as gouache, oil, conte crayon, batik, and mixed media.

Sculpture and Ceramics offers the opportunity for students to create three-dimensional art in a variety of media. Students learn the techniques of hand building with clay, throwing on the wheel, wire sculpture, papier-mâché, and assemblage. Students are encouraged to expand their creativity and develop spatial thinking through 3D medias.

Printmaking and Fibers introduces the basics of reduction printing, etching, monotype, collagraph, felting, embroidery, and weaving. Students are encouraged to expand their creativity and technical potential through a variety of mixed media pieces.

  • Prerequisite for each advanced art class: Studio Art
  • Materials needed for each advanced art class: sketch book

Introduction to Graphic Design

Explores elements and principles of design and their effective application in graphic arts. Familiarizes students with the computer as a design tool. Utilizes Adobe InDesign, Illustrator, and Photoshop. Includes taking design projects from initial brainstorming to a finished design piece.

  • For grades 10-12

Academian

Under faculty tutelage, students create the BJA yearbook, from initial planning of design and ladder to full implementation including photography, design, and layout.

  • By invitation.

Music

Band/Honors

Studies and performs high school-level wind literature. Includes progressive studies in wind instrument and percussion performance. Provides opportunity for individual participation in SCBDA Region and All-State Band auditions and clinics and group participation Concert Performance Assessment. Selected band members join the orchestra to perform symphony literature. Individual grades determined by rehearsal conduct, terms quizzes, and occasional playing tests.

Honors adds to the student’s membership in Concert Band a rotating cycle of assignments relating to music theory, practice habits, and wind band literature.

Choir/Honors

Studies and performs high school-level and advanced choral music. Introduces basic music theory and develops sight-singing, musicianship, and choral tone. Includes weekly practice assignments. Presents music from several style periods in both sacred and secular formats. Participates in SCMEA choral festival and several community outreaches.

Honors adds to membership in Concert Choir that the student will complete music theory and ear-training projects, and participate in solo performance competition (e.g., BJA Solo competition, NATS competition).

  • Placement: open for concert choir, voicing assigned by audition in class; honors is available for students in grades 11 and 12 by invitation or audition
  • Required performance attire

Handbell Choir/Honors

Emphasizes development of ensemble skills and personal musicianship through the study of a comprehensive range of intermediate handbell repertoire.

Honors adds to membership in the Handbell Choir development of ensemble skills and personal musicianship through the study of a comprehensive range of advanced handbell repertoire, performing transcriptions of standard repertoire from across the music periods, original handbell compositions, and challenging arrangements of hymns and folk songs.

  • Placement: by audition, requires music-reading ability; honors is available for students in grades 11 and 12, requires previous ringing experience or extensive musical experience playing piano or a standard band or orchestral instrument, by invitation or audition
  • Required performance attire

Orchestra/Honors

Studies and performs high school-level and advanced orchestral music. Includes participation in chamber music groups, recitals, state contests and festivals, and outreaches.

Honors adds to membership in Orchestra that the student will complete music theory workbook projects, music history reports or presentations and ear-training projects; and participate in two solo performance competitions (e.g., Region Orchestra audition, BJA Solo competition, MTNA competition, SCMEA Solo Competition).

Private Music Lessons

Private music lessons are available while at school—before, after or during the school day. Read more.

Speech

Debate/Honors

Develops research and analytical skills through extensive case writing and practice rounds in Lincoln-Douglas Debate format. Instructs in writing debate cases. Encourages students to participate in the school’s forensic team.

Honors course, which meets concurrently, goes further to develop skills in research and argumentation, questioning, and rebuttal. Students refine public speaking skills while applying more advanced techniques of debate. Students exhibit personal responsibility through independent study by participating in class assignments. Honors activities consist of advanced reading & writing assignments, projects, & enrichment activities.

  • 1st semester only
  • Honors course requires 5+ extracurricular debates

Drama

Teaches the basic principles of interpretation and acting. Encourages students to demonstrate a mastery of several genres of acting and some improvisational work. Students will produce a fully-staged theatrical production as a culmination of their coursework.

  • For grade 12
  • Prerequisite: .5 credit in another speech course
  • 2nd semester only

Introduction to Speech

Introduces the field of speech through a laboratory setting that seeks to break down barriers of stage fright. Teaches the elements of pantomime, basic interpretation, children’s storytelling and acting and public speaking. Includes speeches such as personal experience, demonstration and informative speeches. Includes the areas of poetry and theater history.

  • For grades 9–10

Introduction to Western Thought

Surveys philosophy, starting with the Greeks and ending with modern philosophers Rand, Rawls and Adler. Uses the Socratic method of teaching with an emphasis on active student learning. Students present a final oral philosopher project.

  • 2nd semester only
  • Not offered every year

Speech I/II

Explores a wide range of communication skills. Focuses on the development of techniques in articulation, emphasis and subordination, oral interpretation, storytelling, prose reading, declamation, expository speaking, extemporaneous speaking, group discussion, religious reading and humorous interpretation. Students will begin with literary analysis and basic interpretative techniques. They will learn how to compose and deliver effective orations. Students learn how to work in a group setting to present a reasoned defense of one side of a current event issue.  Students both perform and learn to evaluate performances.

Speech II, which meets concurrently, builds on communication, interpretation, logic and reasoning skills introduced in Speech I. Develops independent and collaborative skills in evaluation and speaking. Students will study play production, impromptu duet acting, duo interpretation, public forum debate (PFD), RTV news/commercials, poetry, and student congress. Students are encouraged to participate in speech and debate competitions.

  • For grades 11–12
  • Prerequisite for Speech II: Speech I

Dual Credit

Requirements

Suggested courses

  • Ar 121 Drawing & Structural Representation
  • Com 101 Fundamentals of Speech

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Algebra I/Honors

Introduces basic algebraic concepts, including real number subsets and operations, polynomial operations and factoring, solving equations (linear, radical, rational and quadratic), solving word problems, and graphing lines, functions and inequalities.

Honors course moves at an accelerated pace and goes further, including instruction in graphing and TI-BASIC programming. Enrichment topics include mathematical careers, history of mathematics, and problem solving using the American Mathematics Contest format.

  • Required for Algebra 1: TI-30XIIS calculator
  • Required for honors: TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator

Algebra I: General

Reviews basic computations and introduces algebraic concepts. Includes content similar to Algebra I but maintains a slower pace. Utilizes manipulatives for a more concrete understanding of concepts.

  •  TI-30XIIS calculator required

Algebra II/Honors

Reviews elementary algebra with an emphasis on solving equations and graphing functions. Expands to include solving and graphing higher degree, complex, rational, radical, exponential, and trigonometric equations and functions. Integrates models of real-world problems.

Honors course moves at an accelerated pace and goes further. Emphasizes solving and graphing of linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, and systems. Covers operations with radicals, imaginary numbers, polynomials, exponents, functions and rational expressions. Introduces trigonometry, logarithms, matrices, conic sections, and probability. Integrates models of real-world problems.

  • Required for both levels: TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator

Algebra II: General

Reviews elementary algebra with an emphasis on solving equations and graphing functions. Takes an overview approach to the introduction of systems of equations, rational expressions, complex numbers, conic sections and trigonometry. De-emphasizes abstract concepts, derivations and word problems. Stresses concrete models.

  •  TI-30XIIS calculator required

Geometry/Honors

Teaches an appreciation of the attributes of our great God and teaches logical thinking skills using the medium of Euclidean plane and solid geometry. Includes topics such as proofs, logic, area, volume, GeoGebra explorations, trigonometry and transformations.

Honors course moves at an accelerated pace and includes the introduction of more complex topics through varied presentations and media. Uses practice problems that are selectively chosen and tailored for mathematically advanced students.

  • Required for both levels: TI-30XIIS, TI-83 graphing, or TI-84 graphing calculator

Geometry: General

Teaches an appreciation of the attributes of our great God and teaches logical thinking skills using the medium of Euclidean plane and solid geometry.  Includes topics such as logic, area, volume, trigonometry, and transformations. This course is tailored in it’s complexity, scope, and pacing to accommodate differentiated learners and offers more individualized help and more frequent review.

  • TI-30XIIS, TI-83 graphing or TI-84 graphing calculator required

Precalculus/Honors

Introduces a study of algebraic (polynomial, rational, radical) and transcendental (trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic) functions and equations. Studies complex numbers and vectors, polar coordinates and equations, conic sections, matrix algebra, statistics, sequences, and limits with an introduction to the two main concepts of calculus (derivatives and integrals).

Honors course moves at a quicker pace and utilizes challenging assessment questions to allow students to master content.

  • Required for both levels: TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator

Probability & Statistics

Focuses on conceptual understanding and practical applications that captivate students and prepare them to use statistics in college and in real-world situations.   Students will utilize both print and on-line resources for learning and instruction.

  • TI-30XIIS calculator required

Dual Credit

Requirements

Students must complete Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II in order to take any dual credit math course. Some math courses require an ACT Math score as a prerequisite; juniors lacking an ACT score should see the academic office to request placement.

  • Ma 200 Calculus I (Prerequisite: Intro to Calculus; for a student who took regular rather than honors, the student’s teacher must also give a recommendation; also required: ACT Math 31+, SAT 730, or Ma 105 placement)

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PE 9

Teaches fundamental skills, team play, conditioning, strategy, history and terminology and other phases of various individual and team sports. Places an emphasis upon lifetime activities and principles of personal health and fitness. Classes are divided by gender.

  • BJA PE uniform  required; ordered or purchased during the first week of class

Lifetime Sports

Designed to give students the opportunity to gain
personal fitness skills and knowledge through physical education activities. Students will be encouraged to make choices; meet challenges; and develop positive lifetime behaviors in fitness, wellness and movement activity. Emphasis is placed on learning lifetime sports, physical fitness, health-related fitness and wellness and nutrition concepts.

  • Like music groups, may be repeated for credit
  • For grades 10–12

Physical Science/Honors

Covers the definition and measurement of matter, introductory chemistry and basic physics, along with atomic theory, the periodic table, acids and bases, motion, and energy. Focuses on the relationship between science and everyday life. Introduces hands-on labs emphasizing qualitative analysis.

Honors course goes further, focusing on observation and problem solving and following lab experiments with logical, quantitative analysis of the data.

  • Requirement: TI-30X IIS, TI-83 or TI-84 calculator

Biology/Honors

Introduces the general biological topics, such as the definition of life, biochemistry, cell structure and function, biotechnology, genetics, and creation/evolution. Surveys the organisms in the living kingdoms. Discusses ecological principles and their relation to a Christian position. Includes a study of basic human anatomy and physiology and scriptural topics dealing with the human body, mind, and soul. Emphasizes the biological and scriptural topics needed for a Christian to make wise, science-related life decisions.

Honors course goes further, emphasizing critical thinking and problem-solving skills in relation to scientific data and observation.

  • Prerequisite: Physical Science; for Honors, Physical Science: Honors or teacher recommendation

Chemistry/Honors

Introduces the fundamental characteristics of matter as well as an overview of related fields. Surveys the foundational ideas behind atomic structure and bonding, limited stoichiometry, nomenclature, kinetic theory, solutions, equilibrium, thermochemistry, acid-based chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Focuses on the relationship between chemistry and everyday life and identifies the marvels of design in creation.

Honors course goes further, increasing the level of mathematical analysis, covering oxidation reduction reactions and modern materials, and stressing applications of chemistry.

  • Prerequisite: Biology; for Honors, Biology: Honors or teacher recommendation
  • Recommendation: have already taken or be concurrently enrolled in Algebra II
  • Requirement for regular chemistry: non-programmable calculator (e.g. TI-30X IIS)
  • Requirement for honors: TI-30X IIS or better calculator

Physics: Honors

First semester focuses on motion, vector analysis, and forces. Second semester investigates energy, sound, thermodynamics, fluids, magnetism, electricity, optics, and modern physics. Presents topics conceptually through observation of physical phenomena and mathematical analysis. Demonstrations, laboratory activities and self-directed applications promote problem-solving skills. Seeks to cultivate a mindset of using physics to promote human flourishing as well as understanding everyday physical phenomena. Fosters an appreciation and awe for God’s wisdom and power as displayed throughout creation.

  • Recommendation: TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator
  • Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, and Chemistry
  • May take Algebra II concurrently

American Government

Introduces students to general biblical principles of governmental authority before detailing the philosophy, purpose and practice of the United States Constitution. Also explores federal law and American politics. Places a strong emphasis on current events. Includes a mock congress for the purpose of showing young people how a Christian can serve God in government today.

  • Prerequisite: United States History
  • .5 credit; 1 semester
  • SSP 207 National Government may be taken in lieu of American Government (offered 1st semester only)

Current Events

Develops skills in knowing how to use appropriate news sources to learn current events, interpreting them from a biblical worldview, and making appropriate applications. Requires access to online news sources.

Economics

Introduces students to economic principles such as capitalism, supply and demand, markets, and investing. Seeks to develop Christian stewardship, including discussion of materialism and biblical decision making. Uses current events to illustrate the outcome of financial choices.

  • .5 credit; 1 semester
  • SSE 200 Foundations of Economics may be taken in lieu of Economics

Global Studies/Honors

Introduces students to key geographical skills. Emphasizes a knowledge of people and places in the world. Discusses cultures and religions within the framework of world history. Compares/contrasts current events to connect them to their historical foundation. Utilizes real-world problem-solving and collaborative service projects.

Honors class leverages key geographical skills but dives deeper to include a comprehensive survey of themes in world history from Creation to the present, emphasizing God’s providence in His dealings with men. Describes history as a gift from God to augment the biblical record and to spread His fame to all people.  Emphasizes the development of analytical skills through the use of primary documents and argumentative writing in assessments.

United States History

resents a comprehensive survey of United States history from pre-Colonial times to the present, emphasizing God’s control over the foundation of this nation. Focuses on major themes, such as the wars, movements and ideas that have shaped American life over the past three centuries. Uses current events to connect present happenings with their historical foundation.

  • Hi 201 United States History to 1865 may be taken in lieu of 1st semester US History (offered 1st semester only)
  • Hi 202 United States History since 1865 may be taken in lieu of 2nd semester US History (offered 2nd semester only)

World Geography (summer only)

Teaches students about God’s creation and the institutions man has formed in his endeavors to steward what God made.  Students will be taught the physical features of the earth, locations of those features, names and locations of current countries and political leaders, religions, types of governments and economics.

Dual Credit

Requirements

Courses that satisfy BJA requirements

  • Hi 201 United States History to 1865 may be taken in lieu of 1st semester US History (offered 1st semester only)
  • Hi 202 United States History since 1865 may be taken in lieu of 2nd semester US History (offered 2nd semester only)
  • SSP 207 National Government may be taken in lieu of American Government (offered 1st semester only)
  • SSE 200 Foundations of Economics may be taken in lieu of Economics

Suggested course

  • Hi 101 Making of the Modern World

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Culinary Basics & Nutrition

Allows students to evaluate food choices, practice a variety of food preparation techniques, demonstrate table service and etiquette, and explore nutrition and food industry related careers.  Critical thinking and practical problem-solving are emphasized in a cocurricular approach that incorporates principles of mathematics, science, writing, communications, and economics.  The ServSafe® Food Handler employee certification provides increased marketability.

Global Cuisines

Allows students to enjoy the unique stories about people, places, and perspectives that different food communicates.  By learning about what people eat, one can gain insight into broader factors that allow connections to others for the purpose of promoting the Gospel.  Topics include Farm to Table, processes, hunger issues, dining etiquette from around the world, culture, planning events with foods and traditions, world foods, regional foods, and genetically modified foods (GMO’s – from the lab to the dinner table).

  • Prerequisite: Culinary Basics and Nutrition

Personal Finance

Focuses on real-life scenarios involving money. Students are introduced to the fundamentals of budgeting, taxes, investing, interest rates, and college/career readiness. Students should be prepared to successfully steward their resources for God’s glory.

  • .5 credit; 1 semester
  • For grades 11 and 12

Vo-Tech: Exploring Vo-Tech

Introduces students to a variety of vocations such as auto/diesel, welding, HVAC, carpentry, electrical, plumbing, and aviation. Skills are introduced in 3-4 week rotations and involve classroom and hands-on training.

Vo-Tech: Auto/Diesel Technology I and II

Designed to provide training as general service technicians in the maintenance and light repair of all types of auto and diesel vehicles. Students receive training in basic shop safety and proper use of hand tools and equipment. They receive thorough classroom and hands-on training using techniques and industry standard tools for computer diagnostics, brakes, steering, suspensions, engines, transmissions, electrical systems and more. Prepares students for entry level ASE certification. Requires internship of 90+ hours, completed outside class hours.

Auto/Diesel Technology II meets concurrently and advances the level of training in auto diesel service and repair. Students take on more responsibility and leadership roles. Students who are considering a career in this field can be more fully prepared by participating in an internship program. Completion of course yields EPA and ASE certification.

  • Auto/Diesel Technology I: Grades 11-12
  • Auto/Diesel Technology II: Grade 12; prerequisite: Auto/Diesel Technology I
  • Class fee
  • Limited enrollment
  • Meets 2 hours daily, earns 2 credits per year

Dual Credit

Requirements

Suggested courses

  • Ac 103 Introduction to Accounting
  • Ac 203 Principles of Accounting I (Prerequisite: ACT 22+, SAT 1100+, or Ac 103)
  • Ac 204 Principles of Accounting II (Prerequisite: AC 203 Principles of Accounting I)
  • CJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • IAD 101 Architectural Drawing & Design (1st semester only)
  • IAD 102 Introduction to Interior Architecture & Design (Prerequisite: IAD 101)
  • Ps 200 General Psychology

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French I

Teaches basic vocabulary and grammar in a functional context; teaches practical content, such as greetings, asking and answering simple questions to meet survival needs, ordering food, traveling, and relating the Gospel in a simple manner. Divides class time among grammatical explanation, drill and application of concepts to simulate real-life situations.

French II

Expands on the foundation laid in French I while strengthening the comprehension of the spoken and written language. Studies include compound tenses and the subjunctive mode.  Explores French literature, francophone countries around the world, dialects and music.

Spanish I

Introduces the Spanish language and culture. Develops a novice proficiency through communication activities within the themes of the school, the home, the community, and the world. Teaches Spanish culture, from architecture to life in the cities to quinceañera parties. Develops global fluency through a Christian worldview.

Spanish II

Reviews novice language skills and introduces basic intermediate skills. Teaches the basic past tenses by discussing personal experiences, Spanish history, and short literary works. Explores cultural topics such as the history of Spain and traditional festivals. Encourages students to practice using Spanish as a tool for community engagement. Develops global fluency through a Christian worldview.

Dual Credit

Requirements

Languages available to satisfy BJA requirements: Chinese, French, German, Greek (New Testament), and Spanish

Parameters to keep in mind:

  • Check class hours since some of these classes meet across 2 BJA class hours
  • A placement test is required.
  • Similar content cannot be repeated for credit; for those who have taken a BJA course:
    • After Spanish I: begin with Elementary Spanish II (Spn 142) or higher
    • After Spanish II: begin with Intermediate Spanish I (Spn 241) or higher
    • After French I: begin with Elementary French II (Frn 102) or higher
    • After French II: begin with Intermediate French I (Frn 201) or higher

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